What?

A Hoja (pronounced “Ho-Jah”) is a sphere of seeds, soil, clay, and paint. Smash it to scatter the seeds anywhere you want a garden to grow.

  • Seeds

    There are 20 types of flower seeds inside every Hoja, enough to cover 9 square feet. The flowers were selected for their tenacity, drought resistance, and beauty. There are poppies, marigolds, snapdragons, and more. Click here for a full list.

  • Soil

    The soil is organic potting soil. There isn’t enough soil in the Hoja to make a difference to the seeds growth, but it acts as a protective medium, keeping the seeds cool and dry.

  • Clay

    The clay used to form the outer shell of the Hoja is regular potter’s clay. But a Hoja is not fired in a kiln like pottery, it is air dried. This ensures the clay will completely dissolve into the soil when the Hoja is broken.

  • Paint

    The paint is non-toxic, water-based tempera paint, like you’d find in a kindergarten classroom.

Why?

A Hoja main purpose is to explore the illusion of permanence that we live with in our daily lives. Hojas hold a tension in their beauty: you must destroy the Hoja to make the flowers grow. But people find this simple act of smashing a Hoja difficult. Hojas play on the tension of impermanence and beauty, challenging you. [More on this topic]

Where?

Hojas are proudly made in Oakland, California.

Who?

Web designer turned guerrilla gardener, Andrew Morgan is an artist, inventor, and entrepreneur. He enjoys deconstructing everyday objects and turning them into something awesome, to allow them to communicate something uniquely human.

Andrew is a lover of plants and of helping small things grow. He spends all his free time developing new Hoja making techniques, and loves sharing his invention with anyone who will listen.